Fraud and Abuse

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Office of Inspector General (OIG) recently issued a favorable Advisory Opinion on an arrangement that would allow a hospital to offer free items and services to patients who experienced certain complications after undergoing joint replacement procedures at the hospital. The arrangement only applied to a specific list

On September 17, the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) announced criminal charges against 138 defendants for alleged healthcare fraud schemes that resulted in $1.4 billion in losses. Those charged included 23 doctors, 19 nurses and other licensed professionals, and 96 laypeople, in 31 federal districts across the U.S.

Telehealth-related fraud accounted for about $1.1 billion

On August 16, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Office of Inspector General (OIG) issued a favorable Advisory Opinion regarding an arrangement between a Medicare Supplemental Health Insurance (“Medigap”) plan and a preferred hospital organization (PHO). The arrangement in question incentivized Medigap policyholders to seek inpatient care from hospitals that participated in the

Rivkin Radler partners Evan Krinick and Michael Sirignano authored an article, “Compounding the Fraud: Questionable Billing by Pharmacies,” in the July 6 issue of the New York Law Journal. The article discussed the U.S. Department of Justice’s continued concern over fraudulent claims for reimbursement to federal healthcare programs for compounded prescription drugs.

On June 16, Jeffrey Goldstein, a former Manhattan physician, was sentenced to 57 months in prison for taking $196,000 in kickbacks from Insys Therapeutics, a defunct Arizona-based opioid manufacturer. Goldstein pled guilty to conspiracy in 2019 for accepting purported “speaker fees” from Insys in 2013-15 to prescribe the company’s fentanyl spray, Subsys.

Goldstein was one

On May 26, the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) announced criminal charges against 14 defendants in six states for participation in healthcare fraud schemes related to the COVID-19 pandemic. The coordinated takedown involved fraudulent claims for laboratory testing, telemedicine fraud, pharmacy fraud, payment of kickbacks for referrals, and alleged misappropriation of COVID-19 Provider Relief Fund

The U.S. Department of Justice recently announced that CareCloud Health, a Florida-based developer of electronic health records software, agreed to pay $3.8 million to resolve a whistleblower’s allegations that it paid illegal kickbacks to generate sales of its products. CareCloud’s marketing referral program called the “Champions Program” allegedly violated the federal Anti-Kickback Statute (AKS) and

In a recent advisory opinion, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Office of Inspector General (OIG) concluded that certain investments by a health system, manager and physicians in an ambulatory surgery center (ASC) did not create a substantial risk of fraud and abuse under the federal Anti-Kickback Statute (AKS) even though the

The U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) announced on April 13 that James Spina, a licensed chiropractor and the unlawful operator of Dolson Avenue Medical, P.C. (DAM), was sentenced to nine years in prison and three years of post-release supervision. DAM, a multi-disciplinary medical practice in Middletown, New York, purported to provide a variety of pain

In a recent advisory opinion, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Office of Inspector General (OIG) determined not to impose sanctions under the federal Anti-Kickback Statute (AKS) on a drug manufacturer program that offers a free drug to certain eligible patients. The manufacturer uses personalized medicine technology to make the drug from